Antenatal Consultations

Everything you need to in one easy location.

Antenatal Consultations

“Congratulations!”

While this is a very exciting time in your life you may have extra questions or concerns. ​

We are here to help with these.

During you visits with us during your pregnancy we will discuss just a few of the below:

  • Baseline health
  • Pregnancy scans
  • Medications
  • Supplements
  • Diet and Weight
  • Congenital Disease Screening
  • Mental Health
  • Bleeding in Pregnancy
  • Shared Care
  • Vaccinations

“We look forward to joining you on this wonderful journey then being able to meet the new addition to your family”

Whooping Cough & Influenza Vaccinations

It is recommended that from confirmation of Pregnancy that you have visits every 4 weeks up until 28 weeks where you should have fortnightly visits until 36 weeks and then weekly visits until delivery.  At    weeks we will refer you through to the local Antenatal Clinic at Qld Health for an initial consultation.  We are happy to continue to provide shared care throughout your pregnancy to allow you the comfort of seeing your regular GP during this journey.

Pertussis is a highly contagious infection which is most severe in young babies

Pertussis is a highly contagious infection which is most severe in young babies Pertussis (whooping cough) is a highly contagious respiratory infection. In Australia, pertussis is most common among infants

Pertussis vaccine is recommended and funded in every pregnancy

Pertussis vaccine is provided free for pregnant women under the National Immunisation Program (NIP). Pregnant women are strongly recommended to receive a single dose of pertussis vaccine between mid 2nd trimester and early 3rd trimester (between 20 and 32 weeks gestation) of each pregnancy. However, if the vaccine has not been given by 32 weeks, it can be given at any time during the third trimester up to delivery. If pregnant women receive the vaccine earlier than 20 weeks, they do not need a repeat dose during the same pregnancy. Evidence shows transfer of pertussis antibodies to the infant in women who received dTpa vaccine as early as 13 weeks gestation.1 The recommended vaccine is the adult formulation of the combined diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis (dTpa) vaccine. The only medical reason a pregnant woman should not receive this vaccine is if she had an anaphylactic reaction after a previous dose.

Non-funded vaccines

With your Baby coming into the world Albany Clinic stock the recommended vaccines for all other members of your family and friends who will be coming in contact with your precious bundle.  It is recommended that these vaccines be administered at least 4 weeks before the baby is due.  By this vaccine being given it will afford you with the peace of mind that your baby will not come into contact with an individual who unknowingly may be infected.  

Influenza vaccine

Quadrivalent influenza vaccines (QIVs) are provided free for pregnant women under the NIP. Pregnant women are strongly recommended to receive a single dose of influenza vaccine in every pregnancy, preferably before the onset of the influenza season. Women who received the previous year’s seasonal influenza vaccine early in their pregnancy can receive the current seasonal influenza vaccine later in the same pregnancy. Pregnant women can receive influenza vaccine at the same time as pertussis vaccine.

 

Information accessed from NCIRS Fact Sheet 2019